THE CRUISE

 

You will be welcomed by the crew of Ethelbert and after a short safety briefing we set sail down the beautiful river Stour.

 

The first landmark is the pub on the right with the customers usually waving us merrily on our way. Next we pass a small section of privately owned boats on our port and starboard bows (boaty terminology).

 

We then approach the long shallow straight where you will hopefully see lots of fish including bream, rudd, roach, chub, pike, the odd trout, gudgeon, barbel and cod (we’re not sure about the cod).

 

At the end of the straight is the old Bailey Bridge which used to have a narrow gauge track across the river. The bridge is no longer there but you can still see the concrete buttresses. It was used to transport ballast and gravel across the river.

Then we venture out into the wilds with the river winding through weeping willows, reed beds, lilies and fields. You may pass a few anglers on the banks enjoying a days fishing.

There’s plenty of wildlife to be seen including different varieties of dragonflies, damsel flies, incredibly fast kingfishers (who will often wiz past,) coots, mallards, swans, moorhens, birds of prey, herons, egrets, water voles, badgers, otters, grass snakes and the occasional Hippo (although there’s only been one sighting by a 2 year old) 

 

The the longer, hour and a half, sail will continue down river to Chislet marshes. This consists of a tidal lake formed by land subsidence due to underground coal mining at the now disused Chislet Colliery, reed beds and marshland. It’s a fascinating lake, very shallow and full of birds and fish. Although the water at this point becomes cloudy, due to the tidal forces which push river water in and out of the lagoon stirring up the sediment, flounder can be seen - occasionally - as they come up river from the sea to spawn in the brackish water.

At this point we turn and make the return journey gently back to Fordwich.

 

Afterwards why not visit either of our local hostelries: The Fordwich Arms or the George and Dragon for refreshments?

 

We hope you have a lovely time with us.

LIKE FORDWICH RIVER TOURS ON:

THE CRUISE

 

You will be welcomed by the crew of Ethelbert and after a short safety briefing, we set sail down the beautiful river Stour.

 

The first landmark is the pub on the right with the customers usually waving us merrily on our way. Next we pass a small section of privately owned boats on our port and starboard bows
(boaty terminology).

 

We then approach the long shallow straight where you will hopefully see lots of fish including bream, rudd, roach, chub, pike, the odd trout, gudgeon, barbel and cod (we’re not sure about the cod)

 

At the end of the straight is the old Bailey Bridge which used to have a narrow gauge track across the river. The bridge is no longer there but you can still see the concrete buttresses. It was used to transport ballast and gravel across the river.

Then we venture out into the wilds with the river winding through weeping willows, reed beds, lilies and fields. You may pass a few anglers on the banks enjoying a days fishing.

There’s much wildlife to see including different varieties of dragonflies, damsel flies, incredibly fast kingfishers who will often wiz past, coots, mallards, swans, moorhens, birds of prey, herons, egrets, water voles, snakes and the occasional Hippo (although there’s only been one sighting by a
2 year old)

 

On the longer hour and a half sail we will continue on down to the Chislet lagoon. This is a tidal lake formed by land subsidence due to underground coal mining at the now disused Chislet colliery. It’s a fascinating place, very shallow and full of birds and fish. The water at this point becomes cloudy due to the fact the tidal push forces the river in and out of the lagoon stirring up the sediment.

At this point we turn and make the return journey gently back to Fordwich.

 

Afterwards why not visit either of our local hostelries: The Fordwich Arms or the George and Dragon for refreshments?

 

We hope you have a lovely time with us.